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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

A student who is not a US citizen or legal permanent resident and who does not currently possess a green card, visa, or other legal documentation is considered an undocumented student. This even includes those born outside of this country who have lived in this country for a significant portion of their lives.

Your high school counselors and college advisors are equipped with valuable information and resources to help you apply for college and private scholarships. However, due to your undocumented status, notifying people about your status can be a scary and risky thing to do. If you feel more comfortable with your teachers, college recruiters, community members, etc. you can ask them for assistance in applying for college. Not everyone is familiar with the process by which undocumented students must navigate the educational system, so finding key people who know about HB 144 is important.

USU Admissions Office: 435-797-1079
Jeff Sorensen: 435-797-1109

Undocumented and/or DACA students are NOT currently eligible for any Federal Financial Aid Programs. Undocumented and DACA students CANNOT legally receive any federally funded grants.

Some private scholarships may require students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) solely for the purpose of determining private aid eligibility. The FAFSA will result in a Student Aid Report (SAR) bearing the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) that is used to determine financial need. However, undocumented and/or DACA recipients will not be eligible for federal student aid and will receive a “C” code on the SAR requesting documentation of citizenship. Students who do not have Social Security numbers may be asked to submit the paper FAFSA to the financial aid office for a manual calculation of the EFC. All information submitted on the FAFSA, whether online or on paper, must be completely accurate.

No. HB 144 is a House Bill that was passed by the Utah State Legislature, which states that undocumented students who qualify for in-state tuition must attend a Utah high School for three or more consecutive years, therefore meeting Utah residency requirements.

Do I need a notary public to witness me sign the affidavit?

No. While a notary public used to be required to file the Non-resident Tuition Exemption Affidavit , it no longer is.

 
For additional assistance, please contact Jeff Sorensen in the USU Admissions office at 435-797-1109 or jeff.sorensen@usu.edu

HB 144 is a House Bill that was passed in 2002, in the state of Utah that allows qualifying undocumented students to pay in-state tuition if he or she attends a Utah college or university. This means that even though a student does not have residency status, they may attend Utah State University at the resident tuition rate.

In order to QUALIFY for HB 144, a student must meet the following requirements:

  • Student must have attended a UTAH high school for three (3) or more consecutive years.
  • Student must have graduated from a UTAH high school with a diploma or G.E.D.
  • Student must NOT be registered as an entering student at a Utah college or university before the fall semester 2002.
  • Student must have filed an application to legalize his or her immigration status or will file an application as soon as he or she is eligible.

For more information regarding HB144, please visit the Utah State Legislature website.

If you meet all the requirements of HB 144, you may be eligible for the lower resident tuition rate. Please apply HERE.

SB 81 is a Senate Bill that was passed in 2008, states that any individual who is not lawfully present in the U.S. is not eligible to receive scholarships or financial aid. This means that any student not legally documented or a legal citizen (this includes DACA students), cannot receive scholarships through the College/University nor federal financial aid, only private scholarships. For more information regarding SB 81, please visit the Utah State Legislature website.

 

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal. They are also eligible for work authorization. Deferred action is a use of prosecutorial discretion to defer removal action against an individual for a certain period of time. Deferred action does not provide lawful status.

For more information regarding DACA, please visit the  U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website.

BEWARE OF FRAUD. Beware the promises of Notarios! Please visit American Immigration Lawyers Association, "Consumer Alert on DAPA and DACA" for more information.

Toolkit: Resource for Community Partners

 

 

  • Under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;
  • Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;
  • Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;
  • Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
  • Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;
  • Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
  • Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

On February 17, 2015 a temporary injunction suspended DAPA and the renewal of DACA. However, the court’s injunction does not affect the existing DACA program. If you have been granted DACA, it is still in effect. If you need to renew DACA, you may still do so. For more information please read "Statement by Secretary Jeh C. Johnson Concerning the District Court's Ruling Concerning DAPA and DACA."

When your initial two-year grant of deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA) is expiring, you may request a renewal.

To renew DACA, you must meet the initial DACA guidelines and you:

  • Did not depart the United States on or after Aug. 15, 2012, without advance parole;
  • Have continuously resided in the United States since you submitted your most recent DACA request that was approved; and
  • Have not been convicted of a felony, a significant misdemeanor, or three or more misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety

IMPORTANT: DACA DOES NOT award lawful immigration status to recipients; this means that people in a deferred action status are not considered U.S. citizens, permanent residents or eligible non-citizens. DACA does not provide a pathway to citizenship.

DACA recipients are eligible for work authorization, which allows them to be lawfully employed in the United States; to apply for social security numbers; and, depending on the state in which they live, possibly to obtain a driver’s license.

 

On November 20, 2014, the President announced an executive action allowing parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents who have been present in the country since January 1, 2010, to request deferred action and employment authorization for three years, in a new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents* program, provided they pass required background checks.

  • Undocumented individual living in the United States who is the parent of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident and who meets the guidelines listed below.
    • Allows parents to request deferred action and employment authorization if they:
      • Have lived in the United States continuously since January 1, 2010;
      • Had, on November 20, 2014, a son or daughter who is a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident;
      • Are not an enforcement priority for removal from the United States, under the November 20, 2014, Policies for the Apprehension, Detention and Removal of Undocumented Immigrants Memorandum.

On February 17, 2015 a temporary injunction suspended DAPA and the renewal of DACA. However, the court’s injunction does not affect the existing DACA program. If you have been granted DACA, it is still in effect. If you need to renew DACA, you may still do so. For more information please read "Statement by Secretary Jeh C. Johnson Concerning the District Court's Ruling Concerning DAPA and DACA"

For more information regarding DAPA, please visit the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Website.
 

BEWARE OF FRAUD. Beware the promises of Notarios! Please visit American Immigration Lawyers Association, "Consumer Alert on DAPA and DACA" for more information.

 

 

 


The Utah State University Scholarship Office is dedicated to assisting students throughout their college careers by identifying resources to assist with educational expenses, coordination of funding from various resources and providing the highest quality of service.